ARCHIVE



Lunatic
Ink jet on pumice stone powder on sand paper. The mysterious figures of I Lunatici are the results of an unusual photographic shooting session in which the camera has immortalized a crescent moon evocative of an eerie physical presence. The photos are printed on sandpaper prepared with a layer of pumice stone powder

Wreck
Sandpaper mounted on a crumpled metal sheet
This piece of artwork was created with the idea of a battered rattletrap fallen from the sky.

Andarsene
Five square wax columns of different heights, each topped with a different sculpted human face. On the surface the wax sculptures appear completely white, yet the inside is lined with several layers of multicoloured wax. A timer is connected to an electrical heating system hidden in the box under the iron base. In this case at the H.C. Andersen Museum, the heating system was turned on for forty days, almost the entire duration of the exhibition.
As the iron warms up, the wax slowly melts away. During the melting process the wax colours trapped inside the sculptures gradually appear from underneath while the columns and the faces progressively sink and disappear, to finally turn into an abstract flat surface of masses of colours. The sculpture becomes a painting, while the human faces finally enter the abstract world.
The artist decided to keep a part of the last face in its solid form and to turn off the heating system after forty days. The entire process was filmed and transmitted in real time on a dedicated website, yet no recordings have been made of the online video to preserve the poetical spirit of the artwork.